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0
0 20 50 100 200 300 400 500
Number of employees



Exhibit 20.1 When to Hire an Office Manager




• Manage copy services.
• Manage travel.
• Managing “office” budget.
• Conduct administrative appraisals.
• Manage building maintenance.
• Meet with senior professionals on office projects and prioritization.
• Manage work space.
• Others (mentioned previously in chapter).

Characteristics
• Salary: office managers. Depending on firm size salary will range from
$40,000 to $90,000 per year. For most firms hiring their first office
manager, the salary will be in the $40,000 to $55,000 per year range.
• Work hours are typically 50 to 55 hours per week.
• Dress is appropriate to professional staff.
• Career path can include promotion to full-time position, promotion to
management of entire function for firm, and graduation in Human Re-
sources or Finance.
528 The Back Office: Efficient Firm Operations

• Candidates will have at least a bachelors degree in business ad-
ministration.

Personality
• Candidate will show evidence of loyalty, reliability, initiative, problem
solving skills, and organizational capabilities.

There are a variety of higher-learning institutions with a curriculum fo-
cused on office-management. Candidates graduating from these programs
are ideal for hiring in to such a position.


Summary
Managing the office efficiently and effectively will give the firm the best
opportunity to be as productive as possible thereby leading to increased
profits, as well as professional staff morale and a culture which inculcates
the values important to the firm. Whether the firm begins with a part-time
office manager or a full-time person, creating the position, monitoring per-
formance, and putting structure into place will enable efficiency and is crit-
ical to promoting culture and impressing clients.
Determining the appropriate services to centralize at the office level will
also enable the firm to capture economies of scale and leverage scarce re-
sources. It will also reduce the amount of time professionals worry about
managing such resources.
Maintaining the facility is equally important. The office manager is well
positioned to manage this function. Providing an ergonomic and well-main-
tained office space that enables efficiency and productivity for the profes-
sional is critical.
Successful firms also find a systematic way to build culture and capture
firm history. The office management is well suited for this responsibility.
Finally, hiring the right office manager is important because they lead
these functions and set the tone of the office.


RESOURCES
The Association of Professional Office Managers (APOM). APOM promotes excel-
lence in office administration and management.
APOM supports the performance and professional careers of office managers by
providing central resources and services designed to functionally assist members
with their responsibilities. The APOM has web-based resources available to
members including reading lists, white papers, and policy and procedure recom-
mendations. APOM can be found at http://www.apom.us.
529
Office Management

Information on Microsoft™s SharePoint document management and collaboration
tool is available from http://www.microsoft.com/sharepoint.
Office-aide, an office management software productivity suite is available from
http://www.office-aide.com.
The Professional Association of Health Care Office Management specializes in infor-
mation and resources for physician practice management professionals is available
from http://www.pahcom.com.
LOMA is an association of insurance and financial services professional services
companies. LOMA was founded in 1924 and has over 1,250 affiliated firms in 70
countries. LOMA is focused on research and education to member firms inter-
ested in improving company operations is available from http://www.loma.org.
The Institute of Management and Administration is available from online at
http://www.ioma.com.
About the CD-ROM

This appendix provides you with information about the CD that accompanies
this book. For the latest updates, please refer to the ReadMe file located on
the CD.


System Requirements
• A computer with a processor running at 120 Mhz or faster.
• At least 32 MB of total RAM installed on your computer; for best per-
formance, we recommend at least 64 MB.
• A computer capable of running Microsoft Office.
• A CD-ROM drive

NOTE: Microsoft Office Suites is capable of reading Microsoft Office files.
However, users should be aware that a slight amount of formatting might be
lost when using a program other than Microsoft Office.


Using the CD with Windows
To install the items from the CD to your hard drive, follow these steps:

1. Insert the CD into your computer ™s CD-ROM drive.
2. The CD-ROM interface will appear. The interface provides a simple
point-and-click way to explore the contents of the CD.

If the opening screen of the CD-ROM does not appear automatically, fol-
low these steps to access the CD:

1. Click the Start button on the left end of the taskbar and then choose
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2. In the dialog box that appears, type d:\setup.exe. (If your CD-ROM
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brings up the CD Interface described in the preceding set of steps.

531
532 About the CD-ROM

What™s on the CD
The following sections provide a summary of the software and other materi-
als you™ll find on the CD.

Content
As part of this comprehensive guide to professional services firm manage-
ment, we have built an electronic library of relevant planning and opera-
tional documents. The documents, checklists, tools and spreadsheets will be
helpful to the professional services firm in executing the approaches and
methodologies covered in this book. We hope they are as useful to you as
they have been for us.
The templates, links and files provided are intended as a guide to provide
a head start and to help drive critical thinking on the subjects. As with any
tool, they must be refined for usage within any organization, and the specific
circumstances being addressed.
The files are included on the accompanying CD-ROM, and are organized
by chapter.
Any material from the book, including forms, slides, and lesson plans if
available, are in the folder named “Content.”


Applications
The following applications are on the CD:

Adobe Reader
Adobe Reader is a freeware application for viewing files in the Adobe
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Word Viewer
Microsoft Word Viewer is a freeware viewer that allows you to view, but
not edit, most Microsoft Word files. Certain features of Microsoft Word
documents may not display as expected from within Word Viewer.
Excel Viewer
Excel Viewer is a freeware viewer that allows you to view, but not edit,
most Microsoft Excel spreadsheets. Certain features of Microsoft Excel
documents may not work as expected from within Excel Viewer.
PowerPoint Viewer
Microsoft PowerPoint Viewer is a freeware viewer that allows you to view,
but not edit, Microsoft PowerPoint files. Certain features of Microsoft
PowerPoint presentations may not work as expected from within Power-
Point Viewer.
533
About the CD-ROM

OpenOffice.org
OpenOffice.org is a free multi-platform office productivity suite. It is
similar to Microsoft Office or Lotus SmartSuite, but OpenOffice.org is
absolutely free. It includes word processing, spreadsheet, presentation,
and drawing applications that enable you to create professional docu-
ments, newsletters, reports, and presentations. It supports most file for-
mats of other office software. You should be able to edit and view any files
created with other office solutions.

Shareware programs are fully functional, trial versions of copyrighted
programs. If you like particular programs, register with their authors for a
nominal fee and receive licenses, enhanced versions, and technical support.
Freeware programs are copyrighted games, applications, and utilities that
are free for personal use. Unlike shareware, these programs do not require a
fee or provide technical support.
GNU software is governed by its own license, which is included inside the
folder of the GNU product. See the GNU license for more details.
Trial, demo, or evaluation versions are usually limited either by time or
functionality (such as being unable to save projects). Some trial versions are
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Index


A Balance sheet, managing,
357“363
Benchmarking, 16 “52
Abbott, Ida O., 258
activity measures, 21“22
Aberdeen Group, 284
applications and limits of,
Abiatti, Antony, 162, 177
47“50
Accounting, 352“368
best practices and, 22“23
fundamentals of, 352“356
cost-based measures, 21
project cost, 376 “377
expenses, 27“38
systems, 356 “357
finance department, 38“ 41
Acquisitions, 381“382
human resources, 45“ 47
Activity measures, 21“22
information technology,
Advertising, 137
41“ 45
Allocation, firm resource (Exhibit
outcome measures, 21
5.1), 127
performance measures, 21“22
of resources, 178
pitfalls of, 48
of time, 27“29
primer on, 21“26
Appraisals, career, 228“230
professional services firms,
Arthur Andersen, 277
26 “ 47
Assessing your firm, steps to,
quality-based measures, 21
10“15
revenue, 27“38
Asset management, 385“ 427
starting, 25“26
Attrition models, 231“232
targets of, 23“24
Averbook, Jason, 289, 303, 308, 309
time-based measures, 21
time management, 27“29
timing for, 24“25
value of, 18“19
B
Benchmarks, determining, 22
Benefits:
Backlog, 301“302 obligations, 67
Bailey, Robert S., 234 selection of, 225“228
535
536 Index

Best practices, key focus of Collins, Jim, 272
benchmarking, 22“23 Commission schedules, 88“89
Billable resources, managing, Compensation, 66 “71, 240,
297“304 225“228
Bill rates, developing, 30“31 administration, 347“350
Boilerplate documents, contract negotiations for,

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