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ad hoc for this speciÔ¬Āc reason (e.g. ‚Ęan ad hoc measure‚Ä™)
ad hóminem relating to a particular person
ad inÔ¬Ān√≠tum without limit, for ever
ad interim meanwhile
ad Kaléndas Graecas on the Greek kalends (i.e. never)
ad líb(itum) at will, freely; improvised
ad maiórem Dei glóriam to the greater glory of God
(the motto of the Jesuits)
ad na√ļseam to an excessive or disgusting degree
ad notam for guidance
ad persónam to the person, personally
ad rem to the point
ad unguem factus homo an accomplished man right down to his
Ô¬Āngertips (Horace)
Advérsus míseros . . . inhumánus est iocus It is not right to make
fun of miserable people (Quintilian)
Common phrases and expressions

Aequam meménto rebus in árduis serváre mentem Remember to
keep an even temper when things are rough (Horace)
Aliéna nobis, nostra plus áliis placent We prefer what belongs to
others and other people prefer what belongs to us; the grass is always
greener on the other side of the Ô¬Āeld (Publilius Syrus)
Aliqu√°ndo et insan√≠re iuc√ļndum est Sometimes it helps to be mad
(Seneca)
alma mater kind mother (used to refer to the university or school that
one has studied at)
alter ego the other I; a trusted friend; one‪s secondary or alternative
personality
alter idem another I (Cicero)
Amícus certus in re incérta cérnitur A friend in need is a friend
indeed (Ennius)
amícus humáni géneris a friend of the human race
amor pátriae love of one‪s country
anno aet√°tis suae . . . in the . . . year of his/her life
anno Dómini in the year of the Lord (i.e. dating from the birth of
Christ, abbreviated as ce)
annus mir√°bilis a wonderful year
ante mer√≠diem before noon (abbreviated as ‚Ęa.m.‚Ä™)
antíquus antíqua antíquum old
aqua et igni interd√≠ctus forbidden the use of Ô¬Āre and water,
i.e. banished
aqua vitae the water of life
arguméntum ad hóminem an argument relating to a particular
individual (see also ad hominem)
Arma vir√ļmque cano, Troiae qui primus ab oris It√°liam fato
prófugus Laviniáque venit lítora I sing of arms and of the man
who, made fugitive by fate, Ô¬Ārst came from the coasts of Troy to
Italy and the Lavinian shores (Virgil, the opening lines of the
Aeneid)
arr√©ctis a√ļribus with ears pricked up
Ars est cel√°re artem (True) art lies in hiding art
Arte et Marte By art and war
Atque in perpétuum, frater, ave atque vale! And forever, brother,
greetings and farewell! (Catullus; from a poem at his brother‪s
graveside, far from Italy)

274
Common phrases and expressions

Audi√°tur et √°ltera pars Let the other side also be heard (Augustine;
basic principle of law)
a√ļream quisquis mediocrit√°tem diligit whoever loves the golden
mean (Horace)
auri sacra fames the hateful hunger for gold (Virgil)
Ave grátia plena! Dóminus tecum Hail, thou art highly favoured.
The Lord is with thee (St Luke‪s Gospel; the angel‪s greeting to Mary
at the Annunciation)
Ave, imper√°tor, morit√ļri te sal√ļtant Hail, emperor, those who are
about to die salute you (Suetonius, the gladiators‚Ä™ greeting to the
emperor)

Beáti misericórdes Blessed are the merciful (St Matthew‪s Gospel)
bellum ómnium in omnes the war of everyone against everyone
(Hobbes)
Benedíctus qui venit in nómine Dómini Blessed is he who comes
in the name of the Lord (St Matthew‪s Gospel)
Bibámus, moriéndum est Let us drink for we must die
(Seneca the elder)
bona Ô¬Āde in good faith
bonis auspíciis with good auspices
Brevis esse lab√≥ro, obsc√ļrus Ô¬Āo I strive to be brief and I end up
being obscure (Horace)

Caelum, non √°nimum, mutant qui trans mare currunt Those who
travel overseas change their sky but not their heart (Horace)
Caésarem vehis Caesarísque fortunam You carry Caesar and
Caesar‪s fate (Caesar)
cánticum canticórum the Song of Songs (Latin name of the Song of
Solomon)
Carpe diem, quam mínimum crédula póstero Seize the day; trust
as little as possible in the morrow (Horace)
casus belli a justiÔ¬Ācation or cause of war
cave canem beware of the dog
c√°veat emptor let the buyer beware
c√°veat lector let the reader beware
Cedant arma togae Let arms yield to the toga (i.e. military power
should give way to civil authority) (Cicero)

275
Common phrases and expressions

chaos, rudis indigest√°que moles chaos, a raw formless mass (from
which the universe was formed) (Ovid)
círculus vitiósus vicious circle
citius altius fortius faster higher stronger (the motto of the
Olympic Games)
Cito aréscit lácrima, praesértim in aliénis malis Tears are
quickly dried, especially when they are for other people‪s troubles
(Cicero)
Civis Rom√°nus est He is a Roman citizen (Acts of the
Apostles, concerning Paul, who thus avoided imprisonment
and torture)
Cógito, ergo sum I think, therefore I am (Descartes) 144
compos mentis complete of mind; sane
conféssio fídei declaration of faith
Consuet√ļdine quasi √°lteram quandam nat√ļram √©fÔ¬Āci Through
practice it is as if things become second nature (Cicero)
Consuet√ļdinis magna vis est The force of habit is great (Cicero)
contradíctio in adiécto contradiction in terms, oxymoron
coram p√ļblico in public
cornu cópiae horn of plenty
corpus delícti the body in the crime (a clear proof such as a body or
the murder weapon)
Credo quia abs√ļrdum est I believe because it is absurd
Credo ut intélligam I believe in order that I may understand
(Anselm of Canterbury)
Crescit amor nummi, quantum ipsa pec√ļnia crescit Love of
money grows as fast as money grows (Juvenal)
cui bono? to whose advantage? (Cicero, a principle used in
investigating crimes)
cum grano salis with a grain of salt
Cur non ut plenus vitae convíva recédis aequo animóque capis
sec√ļram, stulte, qui√©tem? Why not, like a guest at dinner, satisÔ¬Āed
with life, take your leave, and with mind content take now, you fool,
your sure rest? (Lucretius)
currículum vitae the race of life (Cicero) (the important points in
one‚Ä™s career, abbreviated as ‚ĘCV‚Ä™)
cursus honórum sequence of honours (the steps in the career of
a public ofÔ¬Ācial)

276
Common phrases and expressions

Da mi básia mille, deínde centum Give me a thousand kisses and
then a hundred more (Catullus)
Da mihi castitátem et continéntiam, sed noli modo Give me
chastity and restraint but not just now (St Augustine)
De brevit√°te vitae On the shortness of life (title of a work by Seneca)
de facto in fact, in reality (whether by right or not)
de g√ļstibus non est disput√°ndum There can be no discussion
about tastes
de íntegro anew, once more, from the beginning
de iure in law; rightful
De mórtuis nil nisi bonum speak nothing but well of the dead
de novo starting again; anew
De prof√ļndis clam√°vi ad te, D√≥mine Out of the depths I have cried
to you, Lord (Psalm 130; De profundis is the title of a work by Oscar
Wilde written when he was in prison)
Dei gr√°tia by the grace of God (used in royal and other titles)
‚Ħ deline√°vit . . . drew (a formula with which an artist signed a piece
of work)
Deo favénte with God‪s favour
Deo gr√°tias thanks be to God
Deo volénte God willing
Deus ex m√°china god from a machine (a god who could be lowered
mechanically to resolve the plot at the end of a play, hence any
artiÔ¬Ācial device introduced at the last minute to solve a problem)
Deus vult God wants (motto of the Ô¬Ārst crusade)
Deus, creátor ómnium God, creator of all things (beginning of
a well-known hymn by St Ambrose)
Di nos quasi pilas hómines habent The gods treat us humans as
their playthings (Plautus)
Dictum sapiénti sat est A word is enough to a wise man (Plautus)
dies irae day of wrath
Diffícile est sáturam non scríbere It is hard not to write satire
(Juvenal)
Diffug√©re nives, r√©deunt iam gr√°mina campis arborib√ļsque
comae The snow has gone; now the grass comes back to the Ô¬Āelds
and the leaves to the trees (Horace)
Dimídium facti qui coepit habet A job begun is a job half done
(Horace)

277
Common phrases and expressions

dira necéssitas dire necessity (Horace)
disiécti membra poétae the limbs of a dismembered poet (Horace,
about a quotation taken out of context)
Dívide et ímpera! Divide and rule! (Louis XI of France)
Dixi et salv√°vi √°nimam meam I have spoken and I have saved
my soul
Docéndo díscimus By teaching we learn
Dómine, quo vadis? Lord, where are you going?
(St John‪s Gospel)
Dóminus dedit, Dóminus ábstulit: sit nomen Dómini benedíctum
The Lord gave and the Lord has taken away: blessed be the name of
the Lord (Job)
Dóminus vobíscum The Lord be with you
Dulce est desípere in loco It is sweet to relax on the right occasion
(Horace)
Dum excus√°re credis, acc√ļsas When you think you are excusing
yourself you are really accusing yourself (Jerome)

e contr√°rio on the contrary
e pl√ļribus unum out of many (is made) one (motto of the United
States of America)
Ecce agnus Dei qui tollit pecc√°ta mundi Behold the lamb
of God who takes away the sins of the word (from the Catholic Mass)
Ecce homo Behold the man (St John‪s Gospel: the words of Pontius
Pilate when he showed Jesus to the people)
ed√≠tio princeps the Ô¬Ārst printed edition
Ego sum alpha et √≥mega, princ√≠pium et Ô¬Ānis, dicit D√≥minus deus
I am the alpha and the omega, the beginning and the end, says the
Lord God (The Book of Revelations; alpha and omega are respectively
the Ô¬Ārst and last letters of the Greek alphabet)
Ego sum pastor bonus I am the good shepherd (St John‪s Gospel)
Eheu fug√°ces, P√≥stume, P√≥stume, lab√ļntur anni Alas, Postumus,
Postumus, how quickly the years slip away (Horace)
ei√ļsdem g√©neris of the same kind
eo ipso by that itself
Equi don√°ti dentes non inspici√ļntur Don‚Ä™t look a gift horse in the
mouth (Jerome)
Err√°re hum√°num est To err is human (Cicero)

278
Common phrases and expressions

Esse quam vidéri bonus malébat He preferred to be good than to
seem good (Sallust writing about Cato the younger)
et consórtes and friends
Et in Arc√°dia ego Even I have been to Arcadia or I ( death) am
present even in Arcadia
Et semel emíssum volat irrevocábile verbum And once spoken the
word Ô¬‚ies off and cannot be called back (Horace)
Et tu, Brute Even you, Brutus (Caesar) 25
Ex √Āfrica semper √°liquid novi There is always something new out
of Africa (proverb quoted by Pliny)
ex √°nimo from the heart
ex cáthedra from the Pope‪s seat (and in general of anything said
with the highest authority)
ex gr√°tia as a favour (rather than from obligation)
ex hypóthesi according to the hypothesis proposed
ex libris NN from NN‪s books
ex níhilo out of nothing
ex off√≠cio by virtue of one‚Ä™s ofÔ¬Āce
ex post facto with retrospective action or force
ex siléntio by the absence of contrary evidence
ex témpore on the spur of the moment
éxeunt omnes all leave the stage
√Čxitus acta probat The end crowns the work (Ovid)
Expérto crédite Believe the person who has experience (Virgil)
Exp√©rtus dico: nemo est in am√≥re Ô¬Ād√©lis I speak as an expert: no
one is faithful in love (Propertius)
Extra ecclésiam nulla salus There is no salvation outside the
Church

Faber est suae quisque fort√ļnae Everyone is the architect of their
own destiny (Appius Claudius Caecus)
Faci√©ndi plures libros nullus est Ô¬Ānis Of making many books there
is no end (Ecclesiastes)
Fácilis descénsus Avérno The descent into Avernus (the realm of the
dead) is easy (Virgil)
Facis de necessit√°te virt√ļtem You make a virtue out of a necessity
(St Jerome)
Facit indign√°tio versum Indignation prompts the poem (Juvenal)

279
Common phrases and expressions

<< ŌūŚšŻšůýŗˇ

ŮÚū. 40
(ŤÁ 44 ŮÚū.)

ő√ňņ¬ňŇÕ»Ň

—ŽŚšůĢýŗˇ >>