<< ŌūŚšŻšůýŗˇ

ŮÚū. 41
(ŤÁ 44 ŮÚū.)

ő√ňņ¬ňŇÕ»Ň

—ŽŚšůĢýŗˇ >>

Factum est illud, Ô¬Āeri inf√©ctum non potest It is done and cannot be
undone (Plautus)
Fama crescit e√ļndo Fame grows as it spreads (Virgil)
Fec√≠sti p√°triam div√©rsis g√©ntibus unam, pr√≥fuit ini√ļstis te
domin√°nte capi You have made a single fatherland for different
peoples, it was to the advantage of the unjust to be conquered and
brought under your authority (Rutilius Namatianus, writing about
Rome‪s conquests)
. . . fecit ‚Ħ made (this work) (a formula with which an artist signed a
piece of work)
Festína lente! Make haste slowly! (motto of the Emperor Augustus)
‚Ħ Ô¬Ādes, spes, caritas, tria haec, maior autem horum est c√°ritas
‚Ħ faith, hope and love, and the greatest of these is love (First Letter
to the Corinthians)
Fiat lux! let there be light! (Genesis)
fídei defénsor defender of the faith (one of the titles of the British
monarch)
Ô¬Ādus Ach√°tes a devoted friend or follower
Finis corónat opus The end crowns the work
Ô¬‚√≥reat let it Ô¬‚ower
Fl√ļctuat nec m√©rgitur It is tossed by the waves but is not driven
under (motto of the city of Paris)
Forsan et haec olim meminísse iuvábit Perhaps it will one day be
a pleasure to remember even these things (Virgil)
Fortes fort√ļna √°diuvat Fortune favours the brave (Terence)
fórtiter in re, suáviter in modo strong in deed, mild in manner
(Claudius Aquaviva)
F√ļimus Troes, fuit √ćlion We Trojans have lived, Troy has been
(i.e. Troy and the Trojans are no more) (Virgil)


Gaude√°mus √≠gitur, i√ļvenes dum sumus Let us rejoice while we are
young (beginning of a Neo-Latin student song)
Glória in altíssimis Deo et in terra pax homínibus bonae
volunt√°tis Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace
and good will to mankind (St Luke‪s Gospel)
Graeca sunt, non leg√ļntur These things are in Greek and people
don‪t read what is written in Greek


280
Common phrases and expressions

Graécia capta ferum victórem cepit et artes íntulit agrésti Látio
Greece, which had been captured, in turn captured the savage victor
and brought culture to the farmers of Rome (Horace)
Gramm√°tici certant et adhuc sub i√ļdice lis est Scholars squabble,
and the question is still undecided (Horace)
Gutta cavat l√°pidem A drop hollows out a stone (Ovid)


H√°beas corpus You may have the body (in English law, the opening
words of a writ relating to the lawful or otherwise detention of an
individual) 110
Habent sua fata libélli Books have their own destinies (Terentianus
Maurus)
Haud ignárus summa scélera íncipi cum perículo, péragi cum
praémio He was not unaware of the fact that the greatest crimes are
risky to begin but rewarding to complete (Tacitus)
hic et nunc here and now
hic et ubíque here and everywhere
hic iacet . . . here lies . . . (on gravestones)
hinc hence, from here
Hinc illae l√°crimae Hence those tears (Terence)
História magístra vitae History is life‪s teacher (Cicero)
Hómini poténtiam quaerénti egentíssimus quisque
opportuníssimus To a man who seeks power the neediest is the
most useful (Sallust)
Homo any primate of the genus Homo, including modern humans
and various extinct species
Homo hómini lupus Man is a wolf to man (Hobbes)
Homo s√°piens wise man (Linnaeus‚Ä™ designation for the human species)
Homo sum, humáni nil a me aliénum puto I am a human
being and I consider nothing human to be beyond my compass
(Terence)
honóris causa for honour‪s sake, honorary (especially in the
expression ‚Ędoctor honoris causa‚Ä™, abbreviated ‚Ęh.c.‚Ä™)
horror v√°cui nature abhors a vacuum (a basic principle of physics)
hortus siccus a collection of dried plants
Humánius est deridére vitam quam deploráre It is more worthy
of a man to scorn life than to weep over it (Seneca)


281
Common phrases and expressions

Iacta √°lea est The die is cast (Caesar) 24‚Ä“5
id est that is, that means (abbreviated as ‚Ęi.e.‚Ä™)
Idem velle atque idem nolle, ea demum Ô¬Ārma amic√≠tia est To
want to do and to want not to do the same things, that is indeed the
mark of true friendship (Sallust)
Ille mi par esse deo vidétur That man seems to me like a God
(Catullus)
Immort√°lia ne speres Do not hope for immortality (Horace)
imprímatur it may be printed (originally Papal approval to publish
a book)
in abséntia in (his, her, their) absence
in abs√ļrdum to the point of absurdity
in aetérnum for all eternity
In √°lio ped√ļclum vides, in te r√≠cinum non vides You can spot
a louse on someone else but you can‪t see the tick on yourself
(Petronius)
in córpore in a group
in exténso in (full) detail, in its entirety
in extr√©mis at the point of death; in great difÔ¬Āculties
in Ô¬‚agr√°nti caught redhanded
In hoc signo vinces In this sign you will win (words which came to
the Emperor Constantine in a dream about the cross)
in inÔ¬Ān√≠tum in inÔ¬Ānity
in loco paréntis in the place of a parent
in médias res in the middle of events (Horace)
in nat√ļra in kind (i.e. paid in goods not money)
in pleno in full
in praesénti at present
in própria persóna in his or her own person
in re in the matter of
in saécula saeculórum for centuries of centuries, for ever
in situ in (its) (original) place
in spe in hope
in statu pupill√°ri in the position of a pupil; under authority
in toto completely
in usum Delphíni for the use of the Dauphin (the Dauphin was the
heir to the French throne and anything printed for him avoided the
censors)

282
Common phrases and expressions

in √ļtero in the womb; before birth
in v√°cuo in a vacuum
in vino véritas in wine (is) the truth
in vitro (of biological processes) taking place in a test-tube or other
laboratory environment
in vivo (of biological processes) taking place in a living organism
infra dignitatem beneath one‪s dignity
Innócue vívito, numen adest Live without guilt for God is near
(Ovid; Linnaeus‚Ä™ motto)
ínteger vitae scelerísque purus unstained in his life and innocent of
crime (Horace)
inter √°lia among other things
inter nos between ourselves
Invéntas vitam iuvat excoluísse per artes It is good to have
enriched life through new discoveries (inscription on the medal
presented to winners of the Nobel prize)
invíta Minérva against the grain, against one‪s natural bent (lit.
‚Ęwith Minerva unwilling‚Ä™ because, as Cicero explains, Minerva is the
goddess of wisdom and nothing good is done against her wishes)
Ipse dixit He himself has said it (Cicero; Pythagoreans speaking
of Pythagoras; a statement resting merely on the speaker‪s authority)
ipsíssima verba the very words
ipso facto by that very fact or act
Ira furor brevis est Anger is a short madness (Horace)
Iuc√ļndi acti lab√≥res Labours completed are pleasant (Cicero)
iuráre in verba magístri to swear by the teacher‪s words (Horace)
ius civíle civil law

Labor ómnia vincit ímprobus Unceasing effort conquers all (Virgil)
l√°crimae rerum the tragedy of life
lapsus c√°lami slip of the pen, misprint
lapsus linguae slip of the tongue
laudátor témporis acti a praiser of former times (Horace)
Légio mihi nomen est, quia multi sumus My name is legion for we
are many (St Mark‪s Gospel) (This was the reply to Jesus by a man
who was possessed by many evil spirits; Jesus sent the legion of
spirits into a herd of 2,000 pigs, who rushed headlong into the sea and
were drowned.)

283
Common phrases and expressions

loco cit√°to in the cited place (abbreviated as ‚Ęloc. cit.‚Ä™)
Longum est iter per praec√©pta, breve et √©fÔ¬Ācax per ex√©mpla To
learn by rules is a long road, by example a short and effective
one (Seneca)
locus cl√°ssicus the best-known or most authoritative passage on
a subject
lóquitur (he or she) speaks (with the speaker‪s name following,
as a stage direction or to inform the reader)
Lusus nat√ļrae the whim of nature

Magna Charta the Great Document (signed by King John in 1215
and recognizing the rights of barons and freemen)
magni nóminis umbra the shade of a great name (Lucan)
magnum opus important work, master piece
Maior e longínquo reveréntia Reverence is greater from afar (Tacitus)
Male parta male dilab√ļntur Ill-gotten gain is ill-spent (Naevius)
Malo hic primus quam Romae sec√ļndus esse I would rather be
the Ô¬Ārst here than the second in Rome (Julius Caesar)
Malo quaeri cur nulla (státua) mihi sit pósita quam quare pósita
I would rather people asked why there is no statue of me than why
there is one (Cato)
Manus manum lavat One hand washes the other hand; you scratch
my back and I‪ll scratch yours (Petronius)
Mater ártium necéssitas Necessity is the mother of invention
(Apuleius)
Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea m√°xima culpa My fault, my fault,
above all my fault (from the confession of sins in the Catholic Mass)
membrum viríle the male organ, the penis
Meménto te mortálem esse Remember that you are mortal
meménto mori Remember death
Mendácem mémorem esse oportére A liar needs to have a good
memory (Quintilian)
mens sana in córpore sano a healthy mind in a healthy body (Juvenal)
mir√°bile dictu wonderful to tell
mir√°bile visu wonderful to behold
Miserére mei, Dómine Have mercy on me, Lord
modus oper√°ndi way of working 110
modus vivéndi way of living

284
Common phrases and expressions

monuméntum aere perénnius a more eternal monument than
bronze (Horace‪s assessment of his own poetry)
Moriéndum est Death comes to us all
multum in parvo a great quantity in a small space
mut√°tis mut√°ndis with the necessary changes
Mutáto nómine de te fábula narrátur The tale is about you but the
name is changed (Horace)

Nat√ļra non facit saltus Nature doesn‚Ä™t make leaps (Leibniz)
Nat√ļram exp√©lles furca, tamen usque rec√ļrret You can throw out
nature with a pitchfork but it will always come back in again (Horace)
Navigáre necésse est, vívere non est necésse It is necessary to sail
but it is not necessary to live (Gnaeus Pompeius)
ne plus ultra the furthest attainable point; the culmination, perfection
ne quid nimis nothing in excess (Terence)
Nemo ante mortem be√°tus No one (should be considered) blessed
before they are dead
Nemo enim fere saltat sóbrius, nisi forte insánit No one dances
when they are sober unless they are completely mad (Cicero)
Nemo est tam senex qui se annum non putet posse vívere No one
is so old that they don‪t think they will live for one more
year (Cicero)
Nemo me lac√©ssit imp√ļne No one provokes me with impunity
(national motto of Scotland)
Nescit occ√°sum It knows no setting (said about the Polestar)
Nihil est ab omni parte be√°tum Nothing is blessed by all sides
(Horace)
Nihil obstat There is nothing against (permission to print a book)
Nihil sub sole novum There is nothing new under the sun
(Ecclesiastes)
Nihil tam abs√ļrde dici potest quod non dic√°tur ab √°liquo
philósopho Nothing can be said that is so absurd that it is not said
by some philosopher (Cicero)
Nil admir√°ri Never be astonished (Horace)
Nil desper√°ndum Never despair (Horace)
Nil mort√°libus √°rdui est Nothing is too hard for mortals (Horace)
Nil sine magno vita labóre dedit mortálibus Life has given
nothing to mortals without hard work (Horatius)

285
Common phrases and expressions

nolens volens whether you want to or not, willy nilly
Noli me tángere Do not touch me (St John‪s Gospel)
Noli turbáre círculos meos Don‪t rub out my circles (Archimedes‪
last words, spoken to the soldier who killed him while he was drawing
in the sand)
nomen est omen the name is a sign
nomen n√©scio I do not know the name (abbreviated as ‚ĘNN‚Ä™).
Nómina si nescis perit et cognítio rerum If you do not know the
names of things, then the knowledge of them dies too (Carl von Linné)
Nómina sunt odiósa Names are odious; no names no pack drill
Non ign√°ra mali m√≠seris succ√ļrrere disco I who am not ignorant of
evil am learning to help the wretched (Virgil)
Non liquet It is not evident (Cicero)
Non mortem timémus, sed cogitatiónem mortis It is not death
that we fear but the thought of death (Seneca)
non multa sed multum not many but much (advice to read few

<< ŌūŚšŻšůýŗˇ

ŮÚū. 41
(ŤÁ 44 ŮÚū.)

ő√ňņ¬ňŇÕ»Ň

—ŽŚšůĢýŗˇ >>