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things but to read them carefully)
Non olet It doesn‪t smell (the Emperor Vespasian‪s view of the
revenue from toilet taxes)
Non ómnia póssumus omnes We cannot all do everything (Virgil)
Non omnis móriar Not all of me will die (Horace)
non placet a negative vote in an assembly
non póssumus we are unable: a statement of inability to act
non séquitur it does not follow: an illogical conclusion
Non ut edam vivo, sed ut vivam edo I do not live to eat but rather
eat to live (Quintilian)
Non vitae sed scholae díscimus We learn not for life but for school
(Seneca the younger; usually but wrongly quoted the other way
round) 63
Non, si male nunc, et olim sic erit Even if things are bad now it will
not always be so (Horace)
Non√ļmque prem√°tur in annum Let it be suppressed until the ninth
year (Horace) (advice not to publish something too hastily)
norma loquéndi guide for speaking (Horace)
nota bene observe what follows, take notice (usually drawing
attention to a following qualiÔ¬Ācation of what has preceded)
novus homo a new man, i.e. someone not from a noble family
(Cicero)

286
Common phrases and expressions

nuda véritas the naked truth (Horace)
Nulla dies sine línea No day without a line (working principle for
writers or painters)
Nulla salus bello, pacem te póscimus omnes There is no salvation
in war, we beg you all to make peace (Virgil)
Nulli c√≥ntigit imp√ļne nasci No one is born without punishment
(Seneca)
n√ļmerus clausus closed, Ô¬Āxed number (e.g. of students allowed to
enrol for a course)
Nunc est bibéndum Now we must drink (Horace)

o Oh!
O jerum, jerum, jerum, o quae mut√°tio rerum Oh jerum jerum
jerum, Oh what a changing of things! (refrain of a student song,
originally from Germany)
O témpora, o mores! Oh times, Oh morals! (Cicero)
O terque quatérque beati quis ante ora patrum Troiae sub
moénibus altis cóntigit oppétere! Oh three and four times
blessed you to whom it fell to meet your deaths under the walls of
Troy and before the eyes of your parents! (Virgil)
obiit (followed by date) died ‚Ħ (on gravestones)
óbiter dictum a judge‪s incidental expression of opinion
√“derint, dum m√©tuant Let them hate, as long as they fear (Accius)
Odi et amo I hate and I love (Catullus)
Odi prof√°num vulgus et √°rceo I hate the uneducated masses and
keep them at a distance (Horace)
√“dium numquam potest esse bonum Hatred can never be good
(Spinoza)
Omne bellum sumi fácile, céterum aegérrume desínere All wars
are easy to begin but much harder to Ô¬Ānish (Sallust)
Omnes eódem cógimur We are all forced to go the same way
(Horace)
Omnes una manet nox There is but one night that awaits us all
(Horace)
√“mnia mecum porto mea I carry everything that is mine with me
(Cicero)
√“mnia tempus habent To every thing there is a season (Ecclesiastes)
√“mnia vincit amor Love conquers all (Virgil)

287
Common phrases and expressions

√“mnium rerum princ√≠pia parva sunt Everything has small
beginnings (Cicero)
onus prob√°ndi burden of proof
√“ptima quaeque dies m√≠seris mort√°libus aevi prima fugit Life‚Ä™s
best days are the Ô¬Ārst to slip away from us wretched
mortals (Virgil)
Ora et labóra Pray and work
Ora pro nobis Pray for us
Orátor est vir bonus dicéndi perítus An orator is a good man,
skilled in public speaking (Cato)
ótium cum dignitáte leisure with honour (Cicero)
√“tium sine l√≠tteris mors est et h√≥minis vivi sepult√ļra
Leisure without literature is like dying and being buried alive
(Seneca)

pace (in stating a contrary opinion) with due deference to
(the person named) literally: ‚Ęwith the peace [of N]‚Ä™
Paete, non dolet! Paetus, it doesn‪t hurt! (Pliny the younger; the
words of Paetus‚Ä™ wife as she stabbed herself when they committed
suicide together)
p√°llida mors pale death (Horace)
panem et circénses bread and circuses (Juvenal)
párcere subiéctis et debelláre supérbos to spare the humble and
vanquish the haughty (Virgil)
Pares cum p√°ribus fac√≠llime congreg√°ntur Birds of a feather Ô¬‚ock
together (Cicero)
pari passu with equal speed; simultaneously
pars pro toto the part for the whole
Part√ļrient montes, nasc√©tur rid√≠culus mus The mountains will
give birth and a ridiculous mouse will be born (Horace)
Pater noster qui es in caelis Our father which art in heaven (The
Lord‪s Prayer)
pater pátriae father of the fatherland (one of the emperor‪s titles)
per annum for each year
per √°rdua ad astra through difÔ¬Āculties to the stars (motto of the
Royal Air Force)
per c√°pita per head
per se in and for itself

288
Common phrases and expressions

Perfer et obd√ļra! Be patient and hold out! (Ovid)
perículum in mora there is danger in delay (Livy)
perínde ac si cadáver essent just as if they were a corpse (concerning
the duties of the Jesuits)
persóna grata, persóna non grata a welcome person (especially a
diplomat), an unwelcome person
petítio princípii the logical fallacy of begging the question
. . . pinxit . . . painted (painter‪s signature)
placet an afÔ¬Ārmative vote in an assembly
Plus . . . ibi boni mores valent quam √°libi bonae leges There good
habits count for more than good laws elsewhere (Tacitus, speaking of
the Germans)
pons asin√≥rum any difÔ¬Ācult problem that defeats the slow-witted
(literally: bridge of asses)
Possunt quia posse videntur They can because they think they
can (Virgil)
post festum after the party
post hoc after this
post mer√≠diem after noon (abbreviated as ‚Ęp.m.‚Ä™)
post partum after childbirth
potior est, qui prior est Ô¬Ārst come Ô¬Ārst served
pótius sero quam numquam better late than never (Livy)
praemónitus praemunítus forewarned is forearmed
Praetérea cénseo Cartháginem esse deléndam Moreover I think
that Carthage must be destroyed (Cato) 18
prima f√°cie on a Ô¬Ārst impression, on the face of it
primum móbile the main source of motion or action; in
medieval astronomy, an outermost sphere believed to revolve
round the earth in 24 hours and cause the inner spheres to
revolve
primus inter pares Ô¬Ārst among equals
pro et contra for and against
pro hac vice for this occasion only
pro memória for memory‪s sake
pro p√°tria for the fatherland
pro rata in proportion
pro rege, lege et grege for the king, the law, and the people
pro témpore for the time being

289
Common phrases and expressions

Próbitas laudátur et alget Goodness is praised, but freezes
(Juvenal)
Procul este, prof√°ni Stay away, you who are uninitiated (Virgil)
Próprium humáni ingénii est odísse quem laéseris It is human
nature to hate those you have wronged (Tacitus)
próxime accéssit the person who comes second in an examination
(literally: ‚Ę(s)he approached nearest‚Ä™)
Próximus sum égomet mihi I am nearest to myself (Terence)
Pulvis et umbra sumus We are dust and shadow (Horace)

Qualis ártifex péreo What an artist dies in me (Suetonius, Nero‪s
dying words)
Qualis dóminus, talis et servus As is the master so is the slave
(Petronius)
Quandóque bonus dormítat Homérus Sometimes even good
Homer nods (Horace)
quantum satis as much as sufÔ¬Āces (in recipes, often abbreviated ‚Ęq.s.‚Ä™)
Quem di díligunt aduléscens móritur Those whom the gods love
die young (Plautus)
Qui √°sinum non potest, stratum caedit He who cannot beat the ass,
beats the ass‪s blanket (Petronius)
Qui dormit non peccat He who sleeps does not sin
Qui tacet conséntit Silence means consent
quid pro quo one thing in return for another
Quintíli Vare, legiónes redde! Quintilius Varus, give me back my
legions! (Suetonius; Augustus‚Ä™ lament after the massacre by
Arminius in the Teutoburger pass)
Quis custódiet ipsos custódes? Who will guard the guardians
themselves? (Juvenal)
Quis f√°llere possit am√°ntem? Who can deceive a lover? (Virgil)
Quis, quid, ubi, quibus auxíliis, cur, quómodo, quando? Who,
what, where, with what, why, how, when? (guidelines for
investigating a crime)
quod erat demonstr√°ndum that which had to be shown (at the end
of a geometrical proof, often abbreviated as ‚ĘQED‚Ä™)
quod vide (in cross-references) which see
Quos deus vult pérdere prius deméntat Those whom God wishes
to destroy he Ô¬Ārst drives mad

290
Common phrases and expressions

Quos ego. . . Them I ‚Ħ (Virgil) (unÔ¬Ānished threat pronounced by
Jupiter)
Quot hómines, tot senténtiae There are as many opinions as there
are people (Terence)

rara avis in terris nigróque simíllima cycno a rare bird on the earth
and very like a black swan (Juvenal) 121
red√ļctio ad abs√ļrdum a method of disproving a
premise by showing that the logical consequence is absurd
Reláta réfero I report what I have heard reported
Rem acu tetig√≠sti You have hit the nail on the head (lit. ‚Ęyou have
touched the thing with a needle‚Ä™)
Rem tene, verba sequéntur Hold on to the thing and the words will
follow (Cato)
Repetítio est mater studiórum Repetition is the mother
of study
Réquiem aetérnam dona eis, Dómine Give them eternal rest, Lord
(from the Catholic funeral service)
Requiéscat in pace May he/she rest in peace (from the burial service;
abbreviated on gravestones as ‚ĘRIP‚Ä™)
Ridéntem dícere verum quid vetat? What forbids us to tell the
truth while laughing? (Horace)
rigor mortis the stiffness of death
Roma loc√ļta est, causa Ô¬Ān√≠ta est Rome has spoken, the matter
is over
rus in urbe the country in the city (used of a pleasant surburb)

Salus pópuli supréma lex esto Let the welfare of the people be the
highest law (Cicero)
Sancta simplícitas Holy innocence! (St Jerome and quoted by
Jan Hus)
Sátius est impunítum relínqui fácinus nocéntis
quam innocéntem damnári It is better that the crime of a
guilty man go unpunished than that an innocent man be condemned
(Ulpian)
Sciéntia potéstas est Knowledge is power (Francis Bacon)
. . . sculpsit . . . sculpted (sculptor‪s signature on a statue)
Semper av√°rus eget A miser is always in need (Horace)

291
Common phrases and expressions

semper Ô¬Ād√©lis always faithful (motto of the US Marine Corps)
semper idem always the same (Cicero)
Sen√©ctus est nat√ļra loqu√°cior Old age is by nature somewhat
talkative (Cicero)
sensu stricto in a narrow sense
Serit √°rbores quae saeclo prosint √°lteri He plants trees which will
yield a proÔ¬Āt for a later age (Caecilius Statius)
Si monumentum requiris, circumspice If you seek a monument,
look around (epitaph for Sir Christopher Wren in St Paul‪s
cathedral)
Si parva licet compónere magnis If it is legitimate to put small
things beside large ones (Virgil)
Si tacuísses, philósophus mansísses If you had held your tongue
you would have remained a philosopher (Boethius)
Si vis pacem, para bellum If you want peace prepare for war
(Vegetius)
Sic itur ad astra Thus is the way to the stars (Virgil)
Sic semper tyrannis Always thus for tyrants (allegedly uttered by
Abraham Lincoln‪s assassin)
Sic transit glória mundi Thus passes worldly glory (sung at the
ceremony for the crowning of the Pope)
Silentes leges inter arma The laws are silent when weapons are
present (Cicero)
Símilis símili gaudet Like rejoices in like
sine die indeÔ¬Ānitely (literally ‚Ęwithout a day‚Ä™)
sine ira et st√ļdio without anger or favour (Tacitus) 73
sine qua non a necessary circumstance (lit. ‚Ęwithout which not‚Ä™)
Sit tibi terra levis May the earth lie light upon you (inscribed on
ancient gravestones)
sit vénia verbo if I may be excused for saying so
Spectatóres, fábula haec est acta, vos plausum date Members of
the audience, the play is over, applaud (Plautus)
Spectátum véniunt, véniunt specténtur ut ipsae They come to see
and be seen (Ovid about women at the theatre)

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ŮÚū. 42
(ŤÁ 44 ŮÚū.)

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