<<

. 30
( 61 .)



>>

Internet through it. This Internet connection host computer also must have
two network adapters: one that connects to the Internet and another that
communicates with the local area network. The connection to the Internet
could be through a dialup modem, a broadband modem, or a connection to
another larger network that connects to the Internet. After you complete the
setup wizard, Windows turns the Internet connection server computer into
both a DHCP server and your gateway to your broadband connection and the
Internet.

You need to understand what Windows Internet Connection Sharing does not
do: It does not convert the Internet connection host into a wireless access
point. By contrast, software included with Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X v. 10.2 or
later is capable of turning your AirPort-enabled Mac into an AP.
176 Part III: Installing a Wireless Network

Using Windows Internet Connection Sharing software is equivalent to adding
a cable/DSL router to your network. You could, for example, purchase a stand-
alone AP ” one that™s not also a router and DHCP server ” and attach it to
your PC via an Ethernet port. All wireless PCs in your house can then connect
to the AP, which in turn connects to your host PC. You then connect a dialup
modem to your computer (or perhaps installed inside your computer) or
connect the modem to a second Ethernet port. You can then share your
Internet connection (through the dialup modem or through a broadband
modem) with the computers that connect wirelessly to the AP. Figure 9-9
depicts a wireless home network that uses Windows Internet Connection
Sharing to provide an Internet connection to all wireless PCs on the network.



Figure 9-9:
Wireless
A wireless
home
network AP
using
Windows Wireless
Internet PCs Internet
Connection
Sharing to Ethernet cable
provide an
Internet
connection
to all
wireless
Cable/DSL
PCs on the
modem
Host PC
network.



When using Windows Internet Connection Sharing, the host computer must
always be on, with Windows running, so that the other computers in the
home network can access the Internet. In addition, each of the other comput-
ers on the network must be set up to obtain an IP address automatically,
which we describe in the earlier section “Obtaining an IP Address
Automatically.”



Windows 98 SE and Windows Me
To set up Windows Internet connection sharing in Windows 98 SE or
Windows Me:

1. Choose Start➪Settings➪Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Add/Remove Programs icon in the Control Panel.
177
Chapter 9: Setting Up Internet Sharing

3. When the Add/Remove Programs Properties dialog box appears, click
the Windows Setup tab.
Windows Setup will take a few moments to search your hard drive to
determine what Windows components are currently installed on your
computer.
4. When Windows Setup displays the list of Windows components, high-
light the Internet Tools option but make sure that its check box
remains marked (see Figure 9-10).




Figure 9-10:
The
Windows
Setup tab
of the
Add/Remove
Programs
Properties
dialog box in
Windows 98
SE or Me.



5. Click the Details button and then select the Internet Connection
Sharing check box (if it™s not already marked).
6. Click OK twice.
7. Insert the Windows CD when prompted and then click OK again.
8. When the Copying Files dialog box appears, make sure that the drive
letter in the Copying Files From text box is the drive letter assigned to
your CD-ROM drive and then click OK once more.
Windows Setup copies a few files to your computer™s hard drive and
then displays the Internet Connection Sharing Wizard.
9. On the wizard™s opening screen, click Next to display a list of network
adapters (all the adapters ever installed on this computer).
10. Select the network adapter that you plan to use to connect to the
Internet and then click Next.
178 Part III: Installing a Wireless Network

If you™re using a cable or DSL modem, be sure to select the adapter
that™s connected to the cable/DSL modem. If you™re using a dialup
modem, select this modem from the list.
The next screen that appears looks almost the same as the previous
screen but no longer lists the adapter that you selected in this step.
11. Select the adapter that communicates with your network and then
click Next.
If you plan to use your PC as a router for your wireless network, you
should select the Ethernet adapter to which your AP is connected.
12. When the wizard prompts you to create a disk for the client comput-
ers, click Next, insert a floppy disk, and then click OK.
The wizard copies two files to the floppy disk: icsclset.exe and
ReadMe.txt.
If one of the client computers has been connecting to the Internet
through a dialup connection, you might need to run the icsclset.exe
program that the wizard copied onto the floppy disk. This program
reconfigures your Web browser to connect to the Internet through the
network adapter rather than through the dialup adapter. Run this pro-
gram after finishing the wizard if you can™t connect to the Internet from
one of the computers on your network.
13. Click Finish to complete the wizard.
When the wizard completes its magic, the PC on which you ran the
wizard is now both a DHCP server and a NAT server (refer to the discus-
sion in Chapter 2) ” equivalent to a broadband router. You might need
to restart any PC or AP that is connected to the PC for the changes to
take effect.

The host PC has to be turned on for the other computers sharing its connec-
tion to be able to access the Internet.

To remove Internet connection sharing, repeat Steps 1 through 6 ” except
that in Step 5, clear the Internet Connection Sharing check box.



Windows 2000
To set up Internet connection sharing in Windows 2000:

1. Choose Start➪Settings and then click the Network and Dial-up
Connections menu item to display Network and Dial-up Connections
window.
2. Highlight the Local Area Connection item for the network connection
device that will be connected to the Internet.
179
Chapter 9: Setting Up Internet Sharing

3. Choose File➪Properties to display the Local Area Connection
Properties dialog box.
4. On the Sharing tab, select the Enable Internet Connection Sharing for
This Connection check box, as shown in Figure 9-11, and then click OK.




Figure 9-11:
Enable
Internet
connection
sharing in
Windows
2000.



A pop-up message informs you of the local IP address that will be
assigned to the host computer (192.168.0.1) when it restarts. The mes-
sage also instructs you to set each of the client computer™s TCP/IP set-
tings to obtain an IP address automatically (which we discuss earlier in
this chapter).
5. If you™re that sure you want to enable Internet Sharing, click the Yes
button.
You™re returned to the Network and Dial-up Connections window.
6. Close the Network and Dial-up Connections window.
After completing these steps, this Windows 2000 PC is now both a DHCP
server and a NAT server, equivalent to a broadband router. You might
need to restart any PC or AP that is connected to the PC for the IP
addresses to be reassigned.

To remove Internet connection sharing, display the Sharing tab of the Local
Area Connection Properties dialog box and then clear the Enable Internet
Connection Sharing for This Connection check box.
180 Part III: Installing a Wireless Network


Windows XP
To set up Internet connection sharing in Windows XP:

1. Choose Start➪Control Panel.
2. Double-click the Network Connections icon in the Control Panel to dis-
play the Network Connections window.
3. Highlight the Network Connection item for the network device that
you want to use to connect to the Internet and then choose
File➪Properties.
The Local Area Connection Properties dialog box appears.
4. On the Advanced tab, select the Allow Other Network Users to
Connect through This Computer™s Internet Connection check box, as
shown in Figure 9-12.
By default, the Allow Other Network Users to Control or Disable the
Shared Internet Connection check box is selected. Unless you want
other users on the network to be able to enable and disable the shared
connection, clear this check box. For dialup modems, you can also
cause the modem to dial automatically when another computer on the
network attempts to access the Internet.
Using the same process as above on your dialup networking connection,
select the Establish a Dial-up Connection Whenever a Computer on My
Network Attempts to Access the Internet check box. Then click OK. See
Figure 9-12.
You™re returned to the Network Connections window.




Figure 9-12:
Enable
Internet
connection
sharing in
Windows
XP.
181
Chapter 9: Setting Up Internet Sharing

5. Close the Network Connections window.
When you complete these steps, this Windows XP PC is now both a
DHCP server and a NAT server, equivalent to a broadband router. You
might need to restart any PC or AP that is connected to the PC for the IP
addresses to be reassigned.

To remove Internet connection sharing, display the Advanced tab of the
Local Area Connection Properties dialog box and clear Allow Other Network
Users To Connect through This Computer™s Internet Connection check box.



Mac OS X v. 10.2 (Jaguar)
To set up Internet connection sharing in Mac OS X v. 10.2 or later:

1. From the Apple menu, click System Preferences to display the System
Preferences pane.
2. Click the Sharing icon in the System Preferences panel to display the
Sharing panel.
If you don™t see the Sharing icon, click the Show All button on top of the
System Preferences pane, and it will appear.
3. Click the Internet tab, as shown in Figure 9-13.




Figure 9-13:
The Internet
tab in the
Sharing
pane of
Mac OS X.
182 Part III: Installing a Wireless Network

Mac OS X senses which adapter is currently connected to the Internet
and offers an option to share that connection with other computers on
your local network.

<<

. 30
( 61 .)



>>